Birth Control

There are many safe and reliable forms of birth control available to you through Adagio Health. Choosing the best option for you can be a difficult decision. The information below will help you learn the pros and cons of each method. When you’re ready, set up an appointment with us, and one of our healthcare providers will discuss your options with you and provide you with the protection you need.

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What is abstinence? 
Abstinence is not having vaginal, oral, or anal sex.

How does it work?
A man, woman, or couple makes the decision to not engage in intercourse.

What are the good things?
Abstinence is 100% effective against pregnancy and STDs.

Things to consider:
Some people may find it difficult to remain abstinent for long periods of time.

What are condoms? 
Condoms are a barrier method of birth control. Typically made of latex or polyurethane, they slip over the penis.

How does it work?
The condom prevents semen from entering the receiving partner.

What are the good things?

  • In addition to preventing pregnancy, condoms also protect users from STD/STIs.
  • They are inexpensive and sometimes free.
  • No prescription is needed.
  • They are sold at most drugstores.
  • Unless the user has a latex allergy, there are no side effects.

Things to consider:

  • If used incorrectly, condoms can break or leak during intercourse.

What is Nexplanon? 
Nexplanon is a small, flexible thin plastic rod that is inserted under the skin of the inner side of the upper arm by a health care provider.

How does it work?
Nexplanon releases progestin. Progestin is a hormone that blocks your ovaries from releasing eggs and thickens your cervical mucus, helping to block sperm from getting into the uterus.

What are the good things?

  • It lasts for up to three years.
  • You do not have to worry about remembering a prescription.
  • It is virtually invisible.

Things to consider:

  • It does not prevent HIV or other STDs/STIs.
  • In rare cases, Nexplanon can cause:
    • Blood clots
    • High Blood Pressure
    • Heart Attacks
    • Strokes
    • Gallbladder Disease
    • Liver Tumors
    • Breast Cancer
  • If pregnancy does happen, it is more likely to be an ectopic pregnancy

What is an IUD? 
An IUD or Inter-uterine Device is a t-shaped implant inserted into your uterus by a health care provider.

How does it work?
IUDs prevent sperm from fertilizing eggs by affecting their movement.

What are the good things?

  • You have choices when it comes to IUDs
    • Hormonal IUDs last up to five years and release progestin which provides additional protection by thickening cervical mucus, preventing sperm from entering the uterus. They may make your periods lighter.
    • Non-hormonal IUDs made of plastic and a small amount of copper last up to twelve years. They have no effect on your period.
  • You do not have to worry about remembering a prescription.
  • It is invisible and cannot be felt by your partner.
  • You can use it while breastfeeding.

Things to consider:

  • In rare cases, an IUD can:
    • Slip out
    • Cause infection
    • Perforate the uterus
  • You may experience some spotting in between periods.
  • IUDs may cause cramping or backaches.
  • It does not prevent HIV or other STDs/STIs.

What is the patch? 
The patch is a small, Band Aid-like piece of plastic that you place on your skin.

How does it work?
The patch releases hormones through your skin, into your bloodstream, that prevent your ovaries from releasing eggs and thicken your cervical mucus to stop sperm from entering your uterus.

What are the good things?

  • It is only applied once a week.

Things to consider:

  • It does not prevent HIV or other STDs/STIs.
  • In rare cases, the patch can cause:
    • Blood clots
    • High Blood Pressure
    • Heart Attacks
    • Strokes
    • Gallbladder Disease
    • Liver Tumors
    • Breast Cancer

What is the pill? 
The pill is oral contraception taken once-a-day, every day.

How does it work?
The pill releases hormones into your bloodstream that prevent your ovaries from releasing eggs and thicken your cervical mucus to stop sperm from entering your uterus.

What are the good things?

  • There are many types of the pill, so you have options when it comes to the formula that works best for you.
  • It is 97-99% effective in preventing pregnancy.

Things to consider:

  • It must be taken every day, at the same time, in order for it to be effective.
  • It does not prevent HIV or other STDs/STIs.
  • In rare cases, the pill can cause:
    • Blood clots
    • High Blood Pressure
    • Heart Attacks
    • Strokes
    • Gallbladder Disease
    • Liver Tumors
    • Breast Cancer

What is the shot? 
The shot is a hormonal injection given in the arms or buttocks every three months by your healthcare provider.

How does it work?
The shot prevents your ovaries from releasing eggs and thicken your cervical mucus to stop sperm from entering your uterus.

What are the good things?

  • It is only administered once every three months.
  • You can use it while breastfeeding.

Things to consider:

  • You must visit your healthcare provider every three months, on time.
  • Your periods may be irregular when first starting this method of birth control.
  • It does not prevent HIV or other STDs/STIs.
  • In rare cases, the shot can cause:
    • Blood clots
    • High Blood Pressure
    • Heart Attacks
    • Strokes
    • Gallbladder Disease
    • Liver Tumors
    • Breast Cancer

What is the ring? 
The ring is a flexible piece of plastic self-inserted into the vagina for three weeks. It is removed and the woman gets her period on the fourth week. A new ring is inserted each month.

How does it work?
The ring releases hormones into your bloodstream, that prevent your ovaries from releasing eggs and thicken your cervical mucus to stop sperm from entering your uterus.

What are the good things?

  • It is only inserted once a month.

Things to consider:

  • It does not prevent against HIV or other STDs/STIs.
  • In rare cases, the ring can cause:
    • Blood clots
    • High Blood Pressure
    • Heart Attacks
    • Strokes
    • Gallbladder Disease
    • Liver Tumors
    • Breast Cancer

What is spermicide? 
It is a topical product, generally a cream, foam, or gel that kills sperm before reaching an egg.

How does it work?
It is inserted or applied as directed by the package prior to having intercourse.

What are the good things?

  • No prescription is needed.
  • It is widely available at most drugstores.
  • It is inexpensive.

Things to consider:

  • Irritation from spermicide can make you more susceptible to HIV.
  • It does not prevent against HIV or other STDs/STIs.
Emergency Contraception

Emergency contraception, more commonly known as the morning-after pill, can prevent a pregnancy from occurring. It should not be used as a regular form of birth control.

How does it work?
Emergency contraception stops or delays the release of an egg from the ovaries.  It may also prevent fertilization of an egg or prevent a fertilized egg from attaching to the uterus.

What are the good things?

  • It can be used after unprotected sex in cases where other contraceptives have failed or no contraception was used.
  • It’s sold at most drug stores and available without a prescription for those age 17 and older.

Things to consider:

  • It may cause side effects including: tenderness, dizziness and bloating.

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